Choosing Between Strategy Work, Implementation Work, or Both: A Founder’s Dilemma

Choosing Between Strategy Work, Implementation Work, or Both: A Founder’s Dilemma

Hello, Collective 54 subscribers, I’m Greg Alexander, and today, we’re diving into a crucial decision many founders of boutique professional service firms face – whether to focus on strategy work, implementation work, or a combination of both. This decision can significantly impact the trajectory of your firm, the types of clients you attract, and your overall satisfaction with your work. Let’s explore the pros and cons of each approach:

Why One Should Do Strategy Work:

    1. Attracts the Best Clients: Offering strategy services often draws higher-caliber clients who value strategic thinking and are willing to pay a premium for your expertise.
    2. Higher Profit Margins: Strategy work typically commands higher hourly rates or project fees, resulting in better profit margins compared to implementation work.
    3. Less Employee Headaches: Strategic projects tend to involve smaller, more specialized teams, reducing the complexity of managing a large workforce.
    4. Lower Client Concentration Risk: By working with a diverse range of clients on strategy, you can mitigate the risk associated with over-reliance on a single client.
    5. More Enjoyable for Some Founders: Many founders find strategy work intellectually stimulating and fulfilling, making it a more enjoyable aspect of their business.

Why Someone Should Not Do Strategy Work:

    1. Stiffer Competition: The allure of strategy work attracts more competitors, making it challenging to stand out in a crowded market.
    2. Longer Sales Cycles: Closing strategy projects often takes longer due to the need for extensive client education and relationship-building.
    3. Inconsistent Revenue: Strategy projects can be sporadic, leading to uneven cash flow, which might not suit all business models.
    4. Less Predictable Workload: Strategy engagements can be less predictable in terms of workload and deadlines, causing stress for some founders.
    5. Potential Client Disappointment: High expectations for strategic outcomes can sometimes lead to client disappointment if results don’t meet their lofty goals.

Why One Should Do Implementation Work:

    1. Steady Client Flow: Implementation work can provide a consistent stream of projects and clients, ensuring a stable cash flow.
    2. Diverse Revenue Streams: Offering implementation services alongside strategy can diversify your revenue streams, reducing dependency on one area.
    3. Loyal Client Relationships: Implementation work often fosters long-term client relationships, leading to repeat business and referrals.
    4. Predictable Workload: Implementation projects usually have well-defined tasks and timelines, providing founders with a predictable workload.
    5. Client Satisfaction: Clients appreciate one-stop shopping, finding it convenient to have both strategy and implementation services under one roof.

Why Someone Should Not Do Implementation Work:

    1. Lower Profit Margins: Implementation work often involves more extensive resources and lower billable rates, resulting in thinner profit margins.
    2. Higher Employee Headaches: Managing larger teams for implementation projects can be more complex and labor-intensive.
    3. Client Concentration Risk: Relying heavily on a few long-term implementation clients can expose your firm to client concentration risk.
    4. Less Enjoyable for Some Founders: Founders who prefer strategic thinking may find implementation work less personally fulfilling.
    5. Intense Competition: The implementation space can also be competitive, especially if your firm lacks unique differentiation.

Why Someone Should Do Both Strategy Work and Implementation Work:

    1. Meeting Client Needs: Offering both services addresses the full spectrum of client needs, creating a holistic client experience.
    2. Higher-Quality Work: Combining strategy and implementation allows for seamless execution of strategic plans, ensuring higher-quality results.
    3. Diverse Client Base: Serving clients in both areas can help balance your client portfolio, reducing concentration risk.
    4. Optimal Profitability: A balanced approach can optimize profitability by leveraging the strengths of each service offering.
    5. Client Convenience: Clients who seek comprehensive solutions appreciate the convenience of obtaining both strategy and implementation services from a single provider.

Why Someone Should Never Do Both Strategy and Implementation Work:

    1. Overwhelming Workload: Juggling both aspects can lead to an overwhelming workload, potentially compromising the quality of your work.
    2. Confusion in Branding: Mixing strategy and implementation services without clear branding can confuse clients and dilute your firm’s identity.
    3. Lack of Focus: Splitting your focus between two distinct areas can hinder your ability to excel in either one.
    4. Resource Drain: Balancing both aspects can strain your resources, including personnel and time.
    5. Limited Differentiation: Without a clear differentiation strategy, you may struggle to stand out in the market compared to firms that specialize.

In conclusion, the decision to focus on strategy work, implementation work, or both is a critical one that should align with your firm’s unique strengths, goals, and client base. Consider your passion, competition, profitability, and client needs when making this choice.

If you’re interested in further discussing this topic and connecting with peers who face similar decisions, I encourage you to join the Collective 54 Mastermind Community. Here, you can gain valuable insights, network with fellow founders, and navigate the complexities of the professional service industry together. Your journey to success awaits!